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Rental Apartment Buildings

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Many rental buildings listed in this section are managed by companies that deal directly with prospective tenants, which usually makes their rental listings "no-fee". This means you do not need to go through a broker in order to rent an apartment and, therefore, do not need to pay a broker's commission. That being the typical arrangement, variations abound: Some building managers prefer to "outsource" part or the entirety of the rental application process to a brokerage; broker fees may (or may not) be involved under such arrangements.

Whenever possible, we try to show the rental manager's direct contact information. No-fee rental availabilities (if any) are shown directly on the building page. Brokered "fee" listings, for those interested, are on a separate, linked page. Almost all buildings listed here offer unfurnished apartments for long-term lease (typically, 12 or 24 months).

Featured Buildings

Downtown Manhattan Rental Apartment Buildings

This is a partial list of rental apartment buildings in Downtown Manhattan (i.e. below 14th street). The complete list of downtown rental buildings (containing 1094 buildings) is a bit longer.

See all downtown rental buildings (1094 buildings)

Midtown Manhattan Rental Apartment Buildings

Below is a partial list of midtown rental buildings. The longer complete list of midtown rental buildings (1054 buildings) is also available.

See all midtown rental buildings (1054 buildings)

Uptown Manhattan Rental Apartment Buildings

A partial list of uptown buildings can be seen below. The complete list of uptown rental buildings (with 1828 buildings) is also available.

See all uptown rental buildings (1828 buildings)

Upper Manhattan Rental Apartment Buildings

A partial list is given below (you can also view the complete list Upper Manhattan rental buildings (935 buildings)):

See the complete list Upper Manhattan rental buildings in our database (935 buildings).

Roosevelt Island Rental Apartment Buildings

Although Roosevelt Island is officially part of the borough of Manhattan, it is an island, so if you decide to rent there, you'll need to get acquainted with a lesser-known mode of transportation called the air-tram.

Brooklyn Rental Apartment Buildings

See all Brooklyn rental buildings (1312 buildings)

Queens Rental Apartment Buildings

See all Queens rental buildings (470 buildings)

Bronx Rental Apartment Buildings

See all Bronx rental buildings (479 buildings)

Staten Island Rental Apartment Buildings

New Jersey Rental Apartment Buildings

See all eastern New Jersey rental buildings (69 buildings)

The latest additions/updates to the database of buildings were made on: May 6, 2015. Updated recently: 230 West 109th Street , 230 West 18th Street , 244 West 25th Street , 336 West 95th Street , 679 Ninth Avenue

Brokers and Broker's Fees: the Lowdown

In New York, when you rent an apartment through a broker, typically, it is you (and not the landlord) who are expected to pay the broker's commission. The "standard" broker's fee is 15% of one year's rent. Thus, on a $3,000/mo apartment, your standard broker's fee will be $5,400 - no chump change (well, not to most renters, anyway). Sometimes brokers charge less: it is not unheard of to pay a "low fee" of around 10% or less. The most likely explanation is that the landlord is paying a portion of the fee, although some brokerage have lately tried to lower all their fees to better compete for customers.

There are brokers who list (and show) "no-broker-fee" apartments. This typically means they are getting compensated by the owner. Such brokered listings are in the minority. Always make sure you understand the terms under which the apartment is being shown to you.

Typically, when you first contact a broker and ask to see any of the (standard fee) apartments they are showing, they will make you sign an agreement which, in essence, states that if you rent what you are about to see, you'll pay them a fee (that stands even if it later turns out that a broker was not necessary and you could have rented the same apartment directly).

Renting in condo and even more so, co-op buildings usually presupposes a broker (unless you came upon a listing posted by the owner of the unit). This market is much more fragmented and erratic than the "mainstream" rental market, but the upside is that you can find a unique place to live. Be aware, however, that renting in some co-op and condo buildings may require going through the board approval process. Your (presumably knowledgeable) broker should be able to guide you.

Ready to start your no-fee apartment search? Proceed to our free no-fee rental search tool.