Park Slope

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Borough Brooklyn
Area 29,560,562 sq. ft.
Rental listings 20 no-fee, 70 fee ads
Median rent $3,100

Neighborhood Profile

Known for its beautiful brownstone buildings, wide avenues, and neighboring Prospect Park, Park Slope is primarily a residential neighborhood. Nevertheless, you will also find many small bookstores, coffee shops, and restaurants here – particularly along 7th and 5th Avenues. 4th Avenue, along which most new residential development now occurs, is a major traffic route. Park Slope is considered one of the most child-friendly neighborhoods in New York City.

Current Rental Statistics

LayoutAdsMedianAverage
Studio 8$2,350$4,824
1 Bedroom 33$2,700$2,879
2 Bedroom 26$3,414$3,419
3+ Bedrooms 23$3,995$5,051
Total 90$3,100$3,763
See all Park Slope Apartments for Rent

Total: 20 no-fee, 70 fee ads

Neighborhood "Skyline"

0 10 20 30 40 50 1000 Buildings Floors Park Slope

Current Rental Listings (10 out of 90)

$4,850
2.0 baths   low-rise   No fee
posted by brokerage, Oxford Property GroupOxford Property < 2 hours
$4,652
1.0 baths   3 elevators, mid-rise   No fee
posted by broker/agent Evan Osur yesterday
$2,850
1.0 baths   low-rise   No fee
posted by broker/agent Nelson Aybar yesterday
$3,900
2.0 baths   low-rise   No fee
posted by brokerage, Citi Nest Group LLC yesterday
$5,600
2 baths, 1200+ sqf   garage, 4 elevators, low-rise   No fee
posted by brokerage, Citi Habitats yesterday
$3,375
1 baths   low-rise   No fee
posted by broker/agent Vicario Brensley PhillipVicario Brensley yesterday
$3,850
1 baths   elevator, low-rise   No fee
posted by broker/agent Nicholas Maclean LounsburyNicholas Maclean 2 days ago
$2,663
1.0 baths, 600+ sqf   7 elevators, high-rise   No fee
posted by manager, The 38 Sixth Ave Rental OfficeThe 38 Sixth Ave 4 days ago
$4,100
1.0 baths, 900+ sqf   garage, 2 elevators, mid-rise   No fee
posted by broker/agent Sonya Brown 7 days ago
$2,100
1.0 baths   elevator, low-rise   Fee
posted by broker/agent Kosta Blyznakov < 2 hours

Buildings in the Neighborhood

As a rule of thumb, the closer to Prospect Park, the more expensive apartments get. Rent-stabilized apartments can still be found (which means that rents on otherwise comparable apartments can be drastically different). In 2003 the city rezoned 110 blocks in the area, to protect the neighborhood's low-rise brownstones but also to allow for buildings of up to 12 stories high in the Park Slope section of 4th Avenue. Most new developments are happening in this area, previously "home" mostly to auto repair shops and the like.

• 4 floors • 7 units
3 fee ads Last: < 3 hours
• 13 floors • 63 units
3 no-fee ads Last: yesterday
• 4 floors • 8 units
2 no-fee ads Last: < 2 hours
• 4 floors • 40 units
1 fee ad Last: < 17 hours
• 4 floors • 67 units
1 fee ad Last: < 2 hours
• 3 floors • 3 units
1 fee ad Last: < 3 hours
• 4 floors • 8 units
1 fee ad Last: < 22 hours
• 4 floors • 13 units
1 fee ad Last: < 22 hours
• 4 floors • 8 units
1 fee ad Last: < 22 hours
• 6 floors • 36 units
1 fee ad Last: < 17 hours

Historical Notes

Starting from the 1950s, as the middle class was heading for the suburbs, previously prestigious Park Slope was deteriorating. It gradually became a poorer, working-class, predominantly Italian and Irish neighborhood. By the late 1970s, buildings around 5th Avenue were routinely abandoned. This, however, was also when first seeds of revitalization were sewn: resident families and a community of newly-settled feminists (including many lesbians) began renovating abandoned brownstone buildings.

During the 1980s, an influx of immigrant families changed the neighborhood once again. In the 1990s, Park Slope became one of the favorite neighborhoods for "Manhattan refugees" fleeing the spiraling rents on the island. As expected, gentrification has proven to be a mixed blessing, with many old residents decrying the rising prices that ex-Manhattanites were seemingly importing with them.

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